Tagged: school

Autonomy | Consistency – Good feedback causes thinking.

Good feedback causes thinking.

If feedback is one of the most important factors in improving student work and outcomes.

If the modelling of the feedback process enables young people to develop their own self-regulation of improving work.

How does a school implement a whole school feedback policy that takes into account the many nuances of each subject?

Feedback is important. We feedback to students daily in every lesson in a variety of different ways. Part of my role this year has been to draft a feedback policy for the school so that students consistently get effective feedback across the curriculum.

Before venturing any further it’s worth pausing for a moment to consider the difference between marking and feedback (something that is often taken for granted).

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Marking is very much about checking a piece of work against a set criteria. If the criteria is clear and concise this is something students should do themselves before submitting a piece of work. Providing the criteria is clear then the act of marking should open up the gaps in learning. It’s the feedback that follows to the student that can communicate how well a student has met the criteria and initiative improvements to the work. The purpose of feedback? It has to be to close the learning gaps.

In thinking about and working towards effective feedback it’s worth considering what research on the matter suggests – remembering that the research is just start of the conversation.

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Dylan Wiliam.

One of my favourite thinkers on the subject is Dylan Wiliam. From his work with Paul Black called ‘Inside the black box’ they suggested that in order for students to truly benefit from feedback students needed to know three key things:

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I’ve tried to sum this up visually in the diagram below:

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This is where modelling becomes a pivotal part of the feedback loop. In order for students to achieve the required ‘good performance’ it needs to be modelled to them. This could be through the use of work from previous students or live modelling of current work as students are undertaking the task. Simply providing students with a rubric is not always useful as they tend to be vague and abstract. Showing students an example of good performance and then de-constructing it with them to highlight the success criteria seems a far more valuable use of time.

Once students have a more secure understanding of what it is they are aiming for and have made an attempt, they next need to know how far away from the desired good performance they are and what they need to do in order to close this gap – the feedback.

Dylan Wiliam also suggests training students to carry out a number of steps before submitting work (which starts the wheels in motion for self-regulation):

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Slide via @Dan_Brinton

I’ve tried this multiple times and have started to embed this into my practice, insisting students check their work against the criteria, check for spelling errors, e.t.c. before submitting the work. I have also in some cases handed work back to students to carry out these checks sending a clear message to students that they must take some responsibility in the feedback process.

John Hattie.

John Hattie’s meta analysis into effective teaching and more precisely feedback is nicely summed up (in another of @LearningSpy’s slides) here:

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The key idea to take away here is that feedback is really powerful but its impact has the potential to be both positive and negative. So how do we keep the impact positive? How do we train students and motivate them to actively seek feedback themselves and eventually self-regulate part or all of the process?

Effective feedback?

Taking into account some of the ideas from the research and then also spending time talking to teachers in my school who consistently get good outcomes, I drafted (with the help of @Teach_Physics) success criteria for effective feedback (a starting point at least) that could be used to shape a whole feedback policy.

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These criteria can be applied to both verbal and written feedback. As we began to test the criteria by going through our feedback strategies we quickly found that it is difficult to argue that each is not important for closing the learning gap between current and great performance. One aspect of the criteria that we discussed at length was should a feedback strategy be created with observers in mind and be made explicitly visible to them. The answer is probably no. Feedback strategies should concern themselves with improving student awareness of great performance and closing the gap between current and great performance. Ofsted don’t dictate how feedback is given or the frequency of it, therefore as long as a feedback policy contains examples of the strategies being employed by teachers, the emphasis can be placed upon the observer to look at the policy beforehand so they know what to look for. This is an important step forward as it stops teachers creating redundant feedback strategies that have the sole purpose of pleasing an observer rather than closing the learning gap.

Drafting a whole school feedback policy.

In drafting a whole school feedback policy it’s important to take into account a few things:

  1. The principles of effective feedback (see success criteria) are probably the same across different curriculum areas.
  2. The feedback strategies employed by teachers across different curriculum areas are probably not the same.

For example if we take verbal feedback given during a PE lesson on a practical skill vs. written feedback given to a written piece of work in English, the principles of effective feedback are probably the same but the strategy to achieve this is different:

  1. It’s possible to challenge the student in both cases to think about and produce excellent work through verbal (probably easier with verbal feedback in a practical situation as the teacher can model it immediately) and written feedback.
  2. Feedback can be close to the learning – in the moment for the student in PE. The challenge for the English teacher is the turnaround of marking/feedback but there are strategies to help achieve this (code-marking for example).
  3. Ensuring no student opts out of the feedback (especially vulnerable groups like pupil premium) is challenging and there may be issues beyond the teachers control that impact on this, but that doesn’t mean to say we should not aspire to every student acting on feedback to improve their work and close the gap to great performance.
  4. Giving students time to act on feedback is paramount to effective feedback otherwise whats the point? In both situations in this example it’s possible to give students time and space to act on the feedback they receive. It may require some planning in terms of building time into a SoW, but this is a really important part of the process.
  5. Is it manageable for teachers? This is another challenge, but not an impossible one if the teachers (in this example) are prepared to experiment with different strategies (especially when dealing with written feedback).

This academic year we’ve moved our policy on feedback forward by setting the criteria for effective feedback (and we’re open for this to change as new ideas emerge) and then asking curriculum areas to use feedback strategies that hit the criteria and work for their subjects – Autonomy | Consistency.

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Adapting a form I first read about in @HuntingEnglish’s post about whole school feedback, curriculum teams have been asked to create a policy using the template below:

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This will be a working document that is quality assured and tested throughout the academic year through regular work evaluations and lesson observations. The policy also includes an appendix for each curriculum team which they will update with examples of the feedback policy in action so that observers have a clear idea of what they should before going into any classrooms. It makes supportive accountability easier as the curriculum teams have come up with their own strategies (that meet the criteria).

Here’s the first draft of the Science teams policy:

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Feedback matters – lets embed it into our practice rather then bolt it on.

Further reading.

@LearningSpy archive on feedback – http://www.learningspy.co.uk/tag/feedback/

@HuntingEnglish – Whole school feedback – http://www.huntingenglish.com/2015/05/16/whole-school-feedback-policy/

@headguruteacher – Making feedback count – http://headguruteacher.com/2012/11/10/mak-feedback-count-close-the-gap/

@danbrinton – Fast feedback – https://belmontteach.wordpress.com/2013/12/06/fast-feedback-4/

@teachlikeachampion – Forget the rubric – use worked examples instead – http://teachlikeachampion.com/blog/dylan-wiliam-advises-forget-rubric-use-work-samples-instead/

New Google E-Safety project – #WellVersed

Google's new e-safety project - 'Well Versed.'

Google’s new e-safety project – ‘Well Versed.’

I’ve just got back from a very interesting meeting with Google in Bristol. Google have recently (24/03/2014) launched a new E-Safety project called ‘Well Versed.’ Click here to visit the ‘Well Versed’ website.

Young people have grown up in a world where they have always used the Internet, so much so that it forms a huge part of who they are and how they communicate. Google’s project has been set up to give young people a voice on e-safety. They are working on the premise that young people who have safety issues online are more likely to take advice from someone their own age rather than ‘un-hip’ adults. The students who attended the meeting backed this up. The meeting was attended by teachers, police school-link officers, local secondary school students and the local MP Kerry McCarthy. A representative from Google started with a short presentation on the Well Versed project followed by a Q&A session.

What is ‘Well Versed’?

In a nutshell Google want young people to submit a tip for staying safe online by creating a 15 video, animation, e.t.c. The more creative the better. These videos will be monitored by Google with the most creative entries being passed onto 4 vloggers who have been recruited by Google to drive the campaign. The vloggers will then create a short film using the entries submitted by young people. The young people who have their clips used in the film will have the opportunity to visit the Google HQ in June to see a screening of the film.

Why get involved?

Safe-guarding our young people and educating them to use the Internet in a safe way is a responsibility we all share. Google are offering a creative way for students to engage and get involved.

What can schools do?

This is a great opportunity to run a creative e-safety series of lessons with a real competition to work towards. Google have provided resources on their site and some example videos from the vloggers. This could form part of formal lessons or work equally well as an enrichment activity.

Is this just Google?

No. Google are not looking replace or compete with other e-safety or child protection services. They are simply offering a creative way for students to get involved and raise awareness.

Other helpful safe-guarding services.

Beat Bullying

CEOP

Google safety centre

Thinkuknow

Childline

Zipit App

The Parent Zone